Tuesday, 24 April 2007

Much Ado About Nothing

Sometimes I moan too much about my travelling to work woes. I admit that. That is indeed the point of this whole blog.


But last week, something made me smile. I actually took the time to listen to the conversation had by the group of early teens sitting around me. They were discussing their homework. Really! They were! They were talking about the character development in Much Ado About Nothing, and what the different characters represent. It was amazing! Now, I am not that old, and it’s only really been 8 years since I left 6th Form. But I have already fallen into the terrible, clich├ęd view that teenagers are good-for-nothing wasters. But, it would seem, they are not. They actually talk about Shakespeare through choice and appeared to enjoy it, too.


Now, here the moment where I should point out that I work in a particularly well-to-do part of the country, with one of the best public schools in the country, and a handful of other very decent schools too. So perhaps this explains these kids’ general attitude towards learning? Well, it must do. If I was travelling on a train with school kids from somewhere less illustrious (for example, Brixton, where I used to live) I doubt very much the kids would be having these types of conversations.

And I hate this observation. I hate it because I know it is true, even though I realise it sounds inherently snobby to think that kids from rough areas don’t talk about Shakespeare.
Anyway, I should be grateful that I have decent kids on my train. Although they still make far too much noise for my liking.


(And I haven’t read Much Ado About Nothing..)

3 comments:

Yorksdevil said...

I don't believe they were real teenagers. Clearly the government are planting pretend teenagers in the run-up to the elections.

The teenagers on my bus home were discussing drugs.

Daniel (memorex) said...

*ahem*

I'm a teenager, you know... :)

Brennig said...

Brilliant! I'm going to see Much Ado at Stafford Castle at the end of the month...

Could you pass me a teenager to explain the play to me?

Thanks!